LOST CITIES IN THE JUNGLE


Chichen_Itza_Castillo_Frederick Catherwood_1843_drawingThe Castle of Chichen-Itza, 1843, graphic by Frederick Catherwood

“In 1519 Hernan Cortez, the great Spanish conquistador stormed and took the city of Mexico-Tenochtitlan. He did not then, and he never knew, that it was built upon the ruins of the Mayan civilization. Five years later he travelled across what is now the little republic of Honduras, hacking his way foot by foot through an almost impenetrable forest given over to reptiles and insects and the odours of putrefaction. Had he turned aside from the path he was cutting, by only a fraction, he would have come to a little stream where he would have found in the midst of all this luxuriant foliage the ruins of what had once been a great city. It was the city of Copan, the chief light amongst others such as Tikal or Palenque of the Mayan civilization which existed between A.D. 176 and A.D. 620. They are still, far from all other human habitations, lost in the powerful tropical forest which like some sylvan boa-constrictor, has literally swallowed them up and is now devouring them at its leisure, prising the finehewn, close-laid stones apart with its writhing roots and tendrils.”

John Stewart Collis in “The Vision of Glory, The extraordinary Nature of the Ordinary”

Façade_principale_du_palais_des_Nonnes_Désiré Charnay_1859AMain Front of the Palace of the Nuns, Chichen-Itza 1859, graphic by Désiré Charnay

6 thoughts on “LOST CITIES IN THE JUNGLE

  1. Fabulous capture, Ulli. I love the quote by Collis: “lost in the powerful tropical forest which like some sylvan boa-constrictor, has literally swallowed them up and is now devouring them at its leisure, prising the finehewn, close-laid stones apart with its writhing roots and tendrils.”

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You know, Ulli, I was wondering about the name of your blog – Banactee, its so intriguing and unique. Just now I read it below. Not sure I saw this before, I didn’t I guess or else I wouldn’t have missed this interesting note. How innovative of you to derive it from cactus and banana-tree.Any particular reason why these two plants?

    Liked by 1 person

    • I like bananas which are sweet, but I am also belonging to the species being crazy and amazed by deserts, so I admire the plants living in such wasteland like the cactus. Bringing both together led to the new name of this blog sometimes ago comprising quite contradictional aspects of being. Roses are also nice and spiny.

      Like

      • That’s really interesting and truly brings out the contradiction part. Thank you for sharing. I haven’t seen a desert yet, and this reminds me I should plan one.

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.