WATER AMBITIONS OF TUNISIA


In the desert each drop of sweet water
is just more worth than a sack of gold.

 

Water is our cool elixir being unfortunately not everywhere in the world, and we are also mainly consisting of water together with some other elements, thus we really deserve it for being. However, with the ongoing climate change the desert and semi-arid areas will expand even more globally while water shortages even occurr today in countries like Spain or Italy during the summer.

So the question of water will become an elemental challenge and possible crisis trigger of the 21st century. The following photos of Tunisia shall allow not only a short glimpse on this nice North-African country, but may also give an idea what can be the result of fundamental climate changes while this area used to be very fertile only 2,000 years ago when serving also as the breadbasket of the Roman Empire.

Water reservoir Barrage-Sidi-el-Barrak in the still green North near Nefza

This water reservoir is a complete non-touristic place but during this moment of a late afternoon the sentiment and interaction of light, clouds and water revealed something else.

Small paradise with tiny water fountain near Douz, Sahara

Oasis areas in the endless width of the great Sahara desert are often to be found in geological break zones and depressions such as here.

Death zone of the huge salt lake Chott-el-Jerid after sunset, Sahara

The tremendous salt lake Chott-el-Jerid can be traversed today safely on a solid dam with street which is also connecting the oasis areas Nefzaoua and Tozeur. In former times such travel turned out to be a real dangerous adventure.

All photos were made on a self-organized roundtrip through Tunisia in 2006 with a rather simple, but already digital camera.

linked to  Dutch goes the Photo / Tuesday Photo Challenge Water

 

Author: urban liaisons

I like travelling through the diverse realities and cultures of this world not only as a tourist. So this may also happen by simply imaginating the hidden rivers and caves of consciousness where postmodern nomads are crossing wide endless landscapes leading to a dream of no-where. My favourite areas are deserts like the sahara or high mountains, as in these empty terrestric regions the far-away horizon and sky is no limit anymore but a possible gate to inspiration and freedom. Posts will be published normally in English, but whenever appropriate also only in my mother tongue German. Unless otherwise mentioned or individually specified (for example by naming the author, artist, etc.) all texts, photos and/or graphic illustrations in this blog are subject to © urban liaisons (which may please be respected).

8 thoughts on “WATER AMBITIONS OF TUNISIA”

    1. Thank you for your comment. Berber women’s clothes are traditionally often notably colorful and decorative (African influence). But actually other nice destinations are to be visited and discovered. The world is big and wide!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You are right, there is a lot to see out there. Apart from visiting places, I like to talk to people, which is easier when you speak the language. Knowing a language is a kind of magic, that was at least my feeling during my work as an interpreter. At first people were gazing at each other not understanding a thing, the next moment they were laughing out loud because they got the right meaning.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. In Tunisia French is essential, but English now also spreading. In the rural areas many speak only Arabic or one of the Berber dialects. But by friendly using hands and feet helps everywhere in the world.

        Liked by 1 person

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